Multiple Coding Languages Appropriate For Beginners

Today’s technological environment is filled with advanced computational coding paradigms that can seem very daunting at first, but in time and with a little practice, can become nearly second nature. As with anything, time and practice are necessary to achieve sought results; but in terms of career, learning how to code can be fundamental to success.

Several coding languages will be explored here in order of their level of difficulty. Remember that in order to be a good coder and to learn to code sufficiently, all one needs is time and practice As applications become more integral to daily life, learning how to build them only makes sense. So without further ado, let’s take a brief look at today’s popular coding languages.

HTML

HTML is so simple you can master it in high school. This could be your best starting point for learning how to code. Basically, this language is most commonly used in web development and has a number of commands that are contained between brackets, and ultimately end up telling a website how to stylistically present information. HTML is incredibly basic and simple, and is hardly used as a primary coding language anymore.

JavaScript

Don’t confuse JavaScript for Java. Both are in hot demand presently, yet both are different. Here’s the primary delineator between the two: JavaScript pertains to scripting needs, whereas Java pertains to programming needs. JavaScript crosses all platforms, and isn’t too difficult to learn. Since it comes pre-built in all browsers, you don’t need to download anything to start figuring out how JavaScript works. Java primarily derives from “C-language” coding, and has a flexible versatility to it.

Python

With Python, you don’t need to use as many lines of code as other languages require for the expression of certain concepts. You can do a lot really quickly with Python, once you’ve figured it out. One of the best things about Python is that it’s open source, so you can learn how to use it without spending any money.

Ruby

This coding language is an object-oriented type, and has primary utility in the development of mobile applications, as well as websites; making it extremely marketable. You can go to the official Ruby website, take a 20-minute tutorial for the basics, and you’re on your way.

Java

This coding language has been around for 23 years refining the web and expediting innovations in software. Video games, applications used on mobile devices, websites and more are all programmed using Java. Think of it as a C++ addendum. For beginners, Java is ideal, as it’s been on the web for a long time.

Image Source: https://github.com/dkandalov/live-plugin/wiki/Java-code-collapse

You’re Almost There

Once you’ve mastered one set of coding paradigms, you are going to want to put that knowledge to use and design an application or website. Coding is only one part of the process. After you get something put together, you’ve got to refine it, put it through its paces, and ensure it works as it should. You’ll also have to load-test it before launch.

What is load testing? Examples, tutorials, and more can be found on Stackify.com; as the site puts it: “Performance testing is an important component of the application development lifecycle. Without it, your application could fail miserably in real-world conditions. That’s why we build tools like Retrace to help you monitor application performance.” In conjunction with learning code, you’ll want to learn programs like Retrace as well so you can ensure your creations operate as they should.

Today’s web innovations are exciting and expansive, and there are a lot of lucrative opportunities for those who are willing to put in a little time and learn a coding language or two. Between cloud computing and IoT, or the internet of things, there are ample opportunities to make a very good career in coding.

Conclusion

Interested in any of the programming languages we just discussed? Check out HyperionDev’s part-time online coding bootcamps to start your coding journey today.